Health Tip: Avoid Cellphone Use While Driving

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(HealthDay News) -- Drivers should avoid talking on their cellphones while on the road, the U.S. National Safety Council warns.

It's a myth that the human brain can simultaneously handle both the many aspects of driving while chatting with a cellphone in one hand, the council says.

The agency dispels these additional myths:

  • Talking on a cell phone is just like speaking to a passenger. Passengers can help the driver stay alert and navigate, while people on the other end of a phone call have no direct awareness of what is going on in the car.
  • Speaking hands-free is safe while driving. The council warns that drivers on cellphones can be distracted enough to miss seeing pedestrians, red lights and stop signs.
  • I only use my phone at stop lights, so it's OK. Drivers should stay focused even at stop lights. A recent AAA study revealed that people are distracted up to 27 seconds after sending a text message.

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